©-Micronaut-Compound-Eye-Chrysis-Ignita-001a340-4
Browse Gallery
       

Compound Eye – IV (revised)

Chrysis ignita

Magnification: 300:1

Stock image request

Micronaut images are rights-managed. If you want to get a quote, please contact us, providing the following information:  (1) image name, (2) specific use, (3) industry, (4) distribution area, (5) format, (6) circulation or print run, and (7) duration. For further information, click here. Please note that we cannot answer incomplete requests. Thank you.

Name

Email

Message

Please answer the question
1+1=? 

Order Fine Art Prints

Editions and prices upon request

For further information http://www.oeggerli.com/editions/
or e-mail me:info@oeggerli.com

Print Friendly

Compound eye of a Cuckoo’s Wasp (Chrysis ignita). Eyes are generally adapted to the environment and life requirements of the organism which bears them. For instance, the distribution of photoreceptors tends to match the area in which the highest acuity is required, with horizon-scanning organisms, such as those that live on the African plains, having a horizontal line of high-density ganglia, while tree-dwelling creatures which require good all-round vision tend to have a symmetrical distribution of ganglia, with acuity decreasing outwards from the centre.

However, it is not only the shape of the eye that may be affected by lifestyle. Eyes can be the most visible parts of organisms, and this can act as a pressure on organisms to have more transparent eyes at the cost of function. Eyes may be mounted on stalks to provide better all-round vision, by lifting them above an organism’s carapace; this also allows them to track predators or prey without moving the head. The Cuckoo’s Wasps are excellent flyers and have very efficient eyes with plenty of densely packed single lenses.